15Aug

#Movement101 “Hide nothing from the masses of our people. Tell no lies. Expose lies whenever they are told. Mask no difficulties, mistakes, failures. Claim no easy victories…” – Amilcar Cabral

#Movement101 “Hide nothing from the masses of our people. Tell no lies. Expose lies whenever they are told. Mask no difficulties, mistakes, failures. Claim no easy victories…” – Amilcar Cabral

“In a May 24, 2015 post written in his typically blunt style, Seals excoriated what he saw as the hijacking of Ferguson, and the complicity that lies in silence. “BLACK DEATH IS A BUSINESS,”
View Darren’s full Twitter post from May 24, 2015 here. he wrote. “Millions and millions flowing through the hands of these organizations in the name of Mike Brown yet we don’t see any of it coming into our community or being used to help our youth. I’ve been calling out this shit for months […] People see this as an opportunity to not only build a name but make bank at the expense of the lives of people like me.”

This is why you should know Darren Seals, if you didn’t. He was among few writers to clearly call out the division between the activists of the St. Louis region and the broader Black Lives Matter movement. In St. Louis, this division is talked about on the ground but rarely publicly. In the white-dominated mainstream media, where Ferguson is primarily spoken of as a symbol rather than a place where actual people live and suffer and fight, the fractiousness between local and national black movements has gone largely uncovered.”

Meet Darren Seals. Then tell me black death is not a business

This Ferguson protestor and local activist was found murdered in St. Louis last month. To the end, Darren Seals continued to call out those who exploited black suffering for their own benefit – something that didn’t always win him friends. A portrait of a city’s pain and a life cut…

14Aug

A narrative that is critically acclaimed

A narrative that is critically acclaimed’Whose Streets?’ Review: Portrait of Ferguson May Be the Doc of the Year’Whose Streets?’ is both a you-are-there portrait of the tragedy in Ferguson and a chronicle of activism as a triumph. Read the Rolling Ston…

This particular false narrative is very dangerous… it is divisive by design, pitting black women and the black lgbt community against black men. That riff did not exist in #Ferguson. It was created. And things went down hill every since… for famili…