22Sep

Lots of marches, rallies and forums in the Lou right now….

Lots of marches, rallies and forums in the Lou right now….Harris-Stowe State University holds panel discussion on status of African-Americans in St. LouisStudents at Harris-Stowe State University packed a classroom Wednesday for a panel discussion on…

22Sep

“Negroes<br>Sweet and docile, <br>Meek, humble, and kind: <br>Beware the day<br>They change their minds!” Langston Hughes

“Negroes
Sweet and docile,
Meek, humble, and kind:
Beware the day
They change their minds!” Langston Hughes

HUD Secretary Ben Carson calls for peaceful resolution of protests

U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson is urging people in the St. Louis region to make sure protests do not disintegrate into violence.

22Sep

This negro…

This negro…Ben Carson Warns of ‘House Divided’ After Stockley VerdictCarson warns, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.”

22Sep

Photo – I don’t have time to get into everything that is wrong with this piece like Elliot equating the loss of precious dollars to precious life or his simplistic reasoning about poor employees being hurt as a result of the protests and not the $2+ decrease in minimum wage voted in by state officials, allowed to slide by both the republican gov and demoratic mayor And implemented by ‘business’ Elliot is concerned about. Don’t have time to talk about the fact that whatever amount the protests cost, the reason there are costs at all is because of generations of injustices by the establishment.<br><br>So instead I’ll focus on what’s right with his piece,<br><br>”What will have changed for the better? What conditions will have improved? The Stockley ruling isn’t going to change. . <br>The Obama Justice Department decided a year ago not to bring Federal Charges so that option is out. So where too from here?<br>Will anything else change as a result of all this to make life better for minorities? If so What?<br>I’m always comparing events of today with those in the Civil Rights hey day of Dr. Martin Luther king and others. I was around then. <br>For one Dr. King knew what he was trying to accomplish. He had specific goals. He could articulate those goals to anyone and everyone. He knew when he had won a particular battle.<br>Whether the battle was to insure that Blacks could ride anywhere they wanted on public transportation.or could sit at a lunch counter and eat. He fought for the Nation’s leaders to pass the Civil rights Act of 1964 to insure African American got their full measure of freedom. He knew what the objectives were. <br>Today in the St Louis area many residents are rightfully asking what are the goals of the current group so they know when this battle is over?<br>What concretely is expected to change in return for all the sacrifices made by small businesses, low income workers, taxpayers and police! and the city as a whole. <br>Will anything be different after all this or will this be another effort that just runs out of gas and fades away, leaving a lot of people holding the bag!!”<br><br>Like or don’t like Elliot, agree or disagree with the protests, sleep or woke, this is what people want to know.

I don’t have time to get into everything that is wrong with this piece like Elliot equating the loss of precious dollars to precious life or his simplistic reasoning about poor employees being hurt as a result of the protests and not the $2+ decrease i…

“Their collective prayer for St. Louis was not that protests go away or that the city magically heal. They didn’t call for quiet or pit blue lives versus black ones. The prayer leaders lamented not broken windows but broken souls. They dug deep into their own beings and challenged each other, and their fellow believers, to apply a spiritual understanding to the pain felt by fellow children of God.

Catholic. Episcopal. Methodist. Evangelical. Jewish. Muslim.

One after another the message was the same.

“We are witness to a people who are raging with anger,” said the Rev. George Wayne Smith, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Missouri. “And it is well placed, I might add.””

Here’s the thing, members of the clergy have means and influence. We don’t need collective prayer. We need collective action… they can start by using their means and influence to support black liberation and empowerment.

Messenger: From the streets to the pulpit: There can be no peace without justice

At interfaith service, faith leaders find a uniting message.